Sunday, September 18, 2016

your turn# 4, on jainism, ahimsa


what's on your mind?

16 comments:

Daniel Montes said...

Gandhi speaks about the truth, how this is more powerful then violence. It’s hard to see that coming from our western culture that embraces and has been built on violence. Violence always seems to be the solution, if you disagree with someone it’s our first instinct to get aggressive and get ready for what might ensue. This reaction comes out of fear. We live in a world today in which everyone fears something. Our news media fill us with images of how scary the world is, our leaders cant stop telling us how dangerous the world is. This fear only leads to violence because we are made to feel like if it not us its them who will come and attacks us. I believe that Gandhi stumbled on to something that most people can’t understand today. If you allow yourself to not fear death and instead embrace it you will become fearless. Once you don’t fear death there is nothing else to fear.

Anonymous said...

Ian Deck
One of the most important principles in Jainism is ahimsa. It is the concept of compassion and non-injury that applies to humans and animals. The practice of ahimsa is not strictly limited to actions. In fact, Jaina’s assert that it is more important to be non-violent in thought than it is to be non-violent in action. One of Ahimsa’s most famous advocates and practitioners was Mahatma Gandhi, who used it’s power to liberate India from their British rulers. In his book, Gandhi on Non-Violence he outlines how ahimsa should be practiced. It appears to me that his foundation of ahimsa is built on top of several different things. First is Belief, if he didn't believe that compassion was the right way he wouldn't have dedicated his life to it. Bravery is second because it took a tremendous amount of courage to implement his beliefs and pursue non-violent action the way he did. Finally comes Damha (self-governance). Ahimsa is a progression, in order to progress one must be disciplined in their thoughts, words and actions.

ever valladares said...

Jainism is a thought that our world would benefit from its spread. Its non-violence advocacy and its connectedness to everything around us would make this planet an easier one to exist in. Violence is the tool that the human tends to resort to whenever he/she gets frustrated with the situation. If we all took a moment to think and practice the jainist ideals, along with Gandhi's notes on ahimsa, the tension that is everyday present would be no more. These ideas have really resonated in me and have given me a different outlook.

Eric De moraes said...

It is interesting how Gandhi's principles are so familiar to us, regardless of religion, or culture his principles are so noble and comprehensible to anyone, as if these are universal things that separate the good from the bad. Although it seems that his approach to ending conflict was very submissive and challenging to do, to take a peaceful and non-violent approach towards those who come to impose themselves at anyone against them. Dr. Martin Luther King is someone who took the same approach to very end, as we discussed in class. Both MLK and Gandhi did not deviate and both were murdered, which made them icons as their practices of peaceful protest brought about great results as we can see today.

Anonymous said...

Jainism is a religion or a way of like that is truly harmless, and full of bliss. I believe that Ghandi played a major role in enforcing this religion nation wide. The aim of that type of life is to achieve liberation of the soul, and reach pure happiness. Living in a non-violent world makes us appreciate more what one is capable of doing, and liberate our minds. Being more liberal and more kind makes the world a better place to live in, that is why so many people are so fond of this religion. Living in a world where non-violence, no lying nor steading is the perfect world. One would only wish to live in a perfect world like that. We can try to create that and that starts with within, we all know we want a better world and if we try i believe we can achieve.
Carlota Sanchez

Anonymous said...

Gandhi's principles on non violence are very interesting because through nonviolence they were able to defeat the brits and it makes me think how jainism is a beautiful religion. it is enlightenment its it true freedom, being at harmony with jiva and truly living a respectful, caring, pure lifestyle. makes me wonder if the world lived in was a jainist lifestyle what the outcome would be..I feel like it would be a much better world, a utopia almost.. Eager to learn more about this.

Nis Ngambanjong said...

"If we remain non-violent, hatred will die, as everything does, from disuse"

To some that's like watching the NFL Sundays playing flag football.
We are in the time now where we can say that but Gandhi's ahimsa movement was essential, a catalyst, to bring about peace in the turmoil time of India. It brings about peace in exchange for his life, a true martyr til the end. For such a small country, He will forever be remembered in my heart as the OG that gave the nation of never ending sunsets, the biggest middle finger up to date. Without firing a single bullet.

Nis Ngambanjong

Anonymous said...

last week i commented about how i felt Jainism felt less developed or more primitive then Hinduism is certain ways, but the reading we did in class last week have helped me to understand jainism on a deeper level and i believe that is what jainism is; a deeper level of understanding. jainism has an incredible ability to teach its principle, rather then use ahimsa as a means to teach non-violence. jainism teaches that everything is one and to not hurt others is to not hurt yourself. the readings also helped me to see some of the deeper meanings jainism has to offer. what i was mistaking as primitiveness was actually simplicity.
Daniel O'Brien

p.s.
i went to last weeks post so i could reference my post was deleted?

atRifF said...

no, daniel. nothing has been deleted, scroll down and you'll find it.

Diego Vieira said...

16- Man as animal is violent but as spirit is non-violent. The moment he awakes to the spirit he cannot be violent

This is a verse I found to be rather interesting. The principle that violence is easier than non-violence. As humans we are all able to be violent and in some situations, being violent is probably the easier option when compared to being nonviolent. How ever I find that being non violent is something that takes great self control in these situations, and it is something that is built up over time through character and not just always there. It is something we must practice, because if not we will never truly be able to achieve it on a consistent basis. And it also carries over into the principle that ahimsa cannot be preached, it must be practiced. Further emphasizing that discipline is something that is a gradual and life long process.

Anonymous said...

"If one has pride and egoism, there is no ahimsa. For ahisma is impossible without self-control." This is so perfect and clear, yet it is almost impossible to walk outside and not witness this lack of self control. Here, Gandhi is not only saying that egoism is wrong and that it portrays a type of violence and even negligence, but also that it comes from a lack of dhama-- an essential component to our own karma. I want to point out, however, that there are two types of "egoism". One taking a negative form, which is manifested through negative actions such as being too self involved, assuming that your issues are more important than others, etc. There is also a positive type of egoism, that maybe shouldn't be called egoism, and involes one taking care of themselves first through self love, one thinking about their own future in terms of goals and obstacles,etc. In a way, it is natural and 100% human to care about one's self in terms of survival and success. But when we take that one step further and assume that our only purpose is to better ourselves and distance ourselves from others, we are practicing ahimsa. Pride is encouraged in our culture through sports, social staus, even through materialistic possessions... It is up to us to break that cycle by spreading the love and knowledge of such important concepts such as ahimsa.

Gayle Budow

Anonymous said...

Often at times the things in life that may be the best for us aren't always the easiest to either obtain or have it be the outcome. There is usually a sort of give and take process about it whether it tends to be literal or metaphorical. In Gandhi's experts the one that states "so long as one retains one's sword, one has not attain complete fearlessness" is incredibly powerful. Having had OCD pretty bad as a younger child I am able to relate a lot to the quote. When I read it I see it as so long as your constantly worrying and have in the back of your mind that 'what if' mentality in regards to anything in life the more difficult it is to live fear free. It's not to say that you can never have a situation where that 'what if' scenario doesn't come along, but if you let it take over and continue to dwell on it the farther you move apart from being fearless(calm). If you are with discipline able to be comfortable in uncomfortable moments with the what if (not knowing) mindset, the closer you get to living fear free.

-Eric Paz

Anonymous said...

Ghandi really went in depth into the different aspects of ahimsa. He has beautiful lines that make so much sense even in the present. I was unaware that MLK used Ghandi's writings to his own advantage in the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. I can definitely see how as MLK, like Ghandi, was all about nonviolence protest. If you compare Ghandi's teachings and MLK'a practices to the present, you see such a vast difference. Now, there are more violent protests. We can look at Charlotte or Tulsa and there is a vast majority of violent protests. It's something more of a Malcolm X kind of thing, than MLK. It goes against ahimsa. I think if people practice ahimsa, there is a possibility of getting results, I mean it worked for MLK and Ghandi.

Sebastian M. Lorenzo

Awntonio Rolle said...

Gandhi preach and lived by nonviolence which is truly incredible to do. through non violence help them find their peace and happiness. I believe if we were to practice what Gandhi preach we can all really find ourselves and live in a better world. But there is so much violence in world that we never find ourselves because we get brought down to negatively we see everyday. Gandhi legacy lived on with Dr. Martin Luther King jr. MLK was preaching what Gandhi preach until the day he assassinate because he really felt that we can all come together and truly find happiness in our lives.

Daiana Oppecini said...

Even though the concept of ahimsa is a beautiful one, I see it as the Jainism version of a utopic society. It would be marvellous if at least we could all approach our daily lives with more of an ahimsa attitude, doing our best and trying not to harm any other living being. And I think lots of us do so, but harming is sometimes unavoidable. Even if the harm was not intended in the first place, it is still considered some form of violence in Jainism philosophy. The concept of ahimsa in politics is pacifism which does not exclude legitimate defense, but who is it to decide what is legitimate defense? Who has that kind of authority to differentiate fair from unfair? Seems more of an entitled opinion than the objective facts. How would that truly be put into action in times of war? If a country was unfairly attacked and decided it would be in legitimate defense to invade the attacker's country, wouldn't that be contrary to the concept of ahimsa? In politics violence is unfairly justified so we believe it is necessary to keep the peace. What we preach by ahimsa, with western concepts, is nothing but a misinterpretation and misconception of the truly spiritual eastern philosophies.

Calherbe Ernest said...

Now I am finding Jhanism more interesting. I do recommend that people should get involved with its practices because it includes robust principles that will make our lives and relationships healthy and meaningful. But I am having a bit of an issue, trying to agree with the idea of suffering, not fighting back when being attacked. To me it sounds like being a punching bag or a floor mat. Yes, i understand that you will seem larger or noble if you walk away from a fight, because there are probably a million different ways to approach your situations to solve your problems, but i dont understand what you will gain from being a punching bag. How or when will you ever be respected? People will always take shots at you. I am not saying that we should always be aggressive and quick to fight back, all i am saying is that sometimes you're going to have to fight back to defend yourself or for what you stand for. A problem will always be a problem if you dont fix it. In fact it may become a bigger problem. Take our situation here in america for example. In the mist of slavery there were two black figures fighting for the same cause but these two guys had different approaches. MLK and Malcolm X. MLK had a punching-bag, non-violence approach and Malcolm X had a more direct and extreme approach. For some reason MLK campaign was favored and many got involved and we so we managed to cover up our race issues. Yet today we are still having race issues and more issues that goes along with that such as poverty and lack of proper education. Had we followed Mr X by implementing solutions that target real race issues, today it would be less of this "All live matter" and "Black lives matter" crisis.