Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Regarding the Analects your turn #8


pick any topic from our reading. go ahead.

14 comments:

Cindy Matheus said...

Confucius' teachings of being respectful, virtuous, honorable, kind, and cautious are all attributes of character missing from the majority of our society. I have a president-elect who is all but what the Analects teach. Despite that I've learned a great deal in this course about who I am and who I can become by reading and living out these texts that align with my ideology and existence. I've learned to be a blade of grass and that this world is the best of all possible worlds - something that I will take with me throughout my life in challenges and successes. There is no fear of people or events when you are sure of yourself and believe that you are (metaphorically) perfect in this world.

Carlota Sanchez said...

There is a lot of goodness and humanity spoken about in this book, and it is something i truly agree with. They inform that being gentleman like is one way of dealing with a situation. Confucius defined goodness and other positive human qualities. There are two topics that he really focuses on that are altruistic and humane and they are useful for understanding his passage.The gentlemen is one who follows the way and acts according to a system of morals and beliefs. There are many who misunderstand and think people are talking about being superior but it is just a type of chivalry. It is good to take in consideration of how others around us are treated. There are many text where “the core” is mentioned and for me what i believe that is, is the concentration of the mind and the personality on one. When i think of the core in a human body i think of the nervous system and how it works.
Carlota Sanchez

Jonathan Coleman said...

While reading the analects, it gives you a better understanding of what is being read. The master is speaking and using his wisdom to guide men specifically in a path of virtue. Throughout the text, he describes how a man should be and how a man should not. "Slow in speech, never refused instruction, free from confusion, courageous from fear." Its almost as if he's prepping a troop of soldiers out for battle. Confucius responds differently and uses errors and corrective actions."There is the love of being benevolent without the love of learning; the beclouding here leads to a foolishness. There are three things which the superior man guards against. In youth, when he is still physically able, he guards against lust. When he is strong and the physical powers are full of vigor, he guards against pettifoggery. When he is old, and his powers are decaying, he guards against greediness." With this is mind, you can see different perspectives of similar topics and how both of them interpret it.

Anonymous said...

The Analects discuss how we ought to act and who we ought to interact with. In regard to others, we should not be critical or judgmental. If one sees a flaw in an others character or actions they should take the opportunity look inward to see if they possess the characteristic as well. On the other hand, when we notice people who are above us we must try to be like them. This is the idea of gong(respect) and jing(reverence) but it’s also T’ien Li. According to the analects, there is no need to waste time trying to teach those who do not wish to learn. We ought to seek out the virtuous and learn from them instead.
Ian Deck

Anonymous said...

The analects is a truly special text, it has the two fold writing style, like so many of the other great works we have read. Yet the analects feels different then anything else we have read. The style is deeper and makes you work and decipher the message and because of this I feel you not only understand the knowledge better but also find more truth in the words then if they were just there for you to read. I like that Confucius is drawn to the yin and writes more to that style. Men can learn a lot from the workings of the woman's mind just as we all do from our mothers as young children. There's so many levels and truths in the analects that it's hard to separate them and pick individual ones and that almost seems like one of the truths in itself, everything is connected.

Daniel O'Brien

Anonymous said...

“When I walk along with two others, they will serve as my teachers. I will select their good qualities and follow them (their bad qualities and avoid them).”

It is so easy to get lost in this sentence, “…select the good…discard the bad.” Can we consciously not judge other people? It is so easy to jump into conclusions and assumptions, that we keep rejecting people by creating false images of them. How much could we possible learn if we wait, listen, and get the good qualities? I wonder how different would I be today if someone had told me this before. Maybe someone did it, and I did not listen. Than God my ears and mind are opened now.

Elena Murga.

Alec Rodriguez said...

The beauty of the Analects lies within their focus on improvement from within. Cautious speech, quick action, and fidelity and sincerity are the keys to growth and forming healthy and positive relationships with people. By observing our surroundings and ourselves with true intent we can learn how to grow in any environment while giving back to the world which has shaped us. It is the core values which Confucius laid out that make the Analects flourish because they are easy to understand but difficult to perfect. They are a guideline for introspection because once someone is able to see themselves unclouded then they are able to truly understand their world.

Nis Ngambanjong said...

I think if one does not want to follow other major world religions; Confucianism is perfect. His way of seeing the world is unique and simple thus why there are many followers in his time. Chinese people, at that time, were establishing spirituality and seeing the quickest way to T'ien confides in Confucianism. Yes, I think T'ien plays a big part in this movement. Coming from an asian background, the idea of heaven is holy and one doesn't simply speak of it unless you are absent of sin. The fact people heard the idea of a new heaven, I think, spurred up curiosity and began to listen to his doctrine. It worked beautifully, a new "way" to heaven without shaving you head, wearing robes, eating vegetables ..any gruesome traditions for that fact. But that also leads to my curiosity of the diminishing rate of Confucianism in the last decade ever since its birth. My final thought is that, perhaps, the lacking elements of the "way" doesn't make up for the existing qualities of his refined school of thoughts.

Diego Vieira said...

Many of the recent readings in class have been great food for thought. A particular one that stood out to me was the follow quote: “When I walk along with two others, they will serve as my teachers. I will select their good qualities and follow them."

It just encourages one to be the best they can possibly be, especially by attempting to pick up the best qualities from others in order to attempt to a reach a better version of ourselves. Just going with the flow of life at times is the best way to go according to these readings, however we must also be careful and maintain our composure and discipline while doing so.

Awntonio Rolle said...

The Master said, "Respectfulness, without the rules of propriety, becomes tiring; carefulness without the rules of propriety, becomes cold feet; boldness, without the rules of propriety, becomes insubordination; directness, without the rules of propriety, becomes rudeness." This quote really stood out to me because in order to truly become great or having mean you have to understand the way of thinking. You have take advantage of the opportunity giving you cant say you gone do something and do not do it. Saying you going to do something and never doing can become tiring because you not really applying yourself. Respectfulness without the rules of propriety means let the superior man never fail to order his own conduct let him be respectful to others.


Sebastian Lorenzo said...

The Analects were quite insightful. I particularly like the topic of the gentleman or the superior scholar. Chun-tzu means someone who has a good moral compass. This includes following the Tao and internalizing jen. Confucius refers to a gentleman being superior to the “small man.” The gentleman focuses on always doing what is right and never worrying about a personal gain. He explains that a gentleman always acts in moderation, never carrying out his life to any extremes. I believe that Confucius touched on an important point especially for people reading his work today. We live in a society filled with people who are constantly worried about making more money or doing bigger things that they lack virtue and therefore, are not wholesome, not genuine beings. I also hope to see more of this practiced in our lives because it seems to be nonexistent.

Daiana Oppecini said...

The Master said, "I do not open up the truth to one who is not eager to know, nor help out any one who is not interested to understand. " I simply loved this verse. It reminds me of the many occasions when either somebody tried to help me or of the times when I was trying to help someone else. If there is resistance from the mind, there can never be enough humility to learn. If there is too much pride, the helping hand offered will never be accepted. I believe it comes down to "being a blade of grass", gently bent by the passing breeze. Being a blade of grass does not mean weakness, but adaptability and resilience. The grass doesn't suffer when there is a storm, it absorbs the rain and grow stronger.

felipe rios said...

People should never compensate for the short-comings of the surrounding environment. as night turns around into day one must try and turn anger into joy and greed into generosity. As flowers leaning against each other in union we must face bigotry and resent the same way, in unity. As the sun rises and the watched sunrise watches the watcher we must also learn to be appreciated and let go of the fear that holds us from being "unappreciable". as mornings are born from shadows love must born from hate as we all try and remember the never ending quest of giving.

Anonymous said...

One of my favorite concepts about Confucianism is that of Yan Ren-- slow and conscious speak. I've always been told "it's not what you say, but how you say it". No matter what, I always find myself thinking faster than I can speak. I slur my words, I get confused, and I rush through my anxiety.

Why do we rush through life? Enjoying the euphoric moments of life and completely disregarding the boring, awkward moments is like walking through a library and never picking up a book, fearing you might pick up the wrong one. I genuinely enjoyed this class not only because it exposed me to good people and new ontological principles, but also because it allowed me to view the world through a different lens. It has helped me find peace in the fallacies of this world, in the everything and the nothingness, in the essence of dharma, and most importantly reminded me anything can be achieved with a little self governance and determination.

The Master said, "To have faults and not to change them, this is really having faults."

Gayle Budow