Monday, October 10, 2016

your turn #5 YOGA


12 comments:

Anonymous said...

Ian Deck
One of the key concepts of yoga is alienation. Alienation applies to atman/ brahman as well as the relationship between purusha (self) and pakriti (matter). Yoga aims to break the tension between purusha and pakriti through inward movement that leads to enstasis. Reaching enstasis requires one to follow the spiritual path to ascention, which Patanjali laid out in his sutras. The overall concept of the sutras is to act in a way that results in positive outcomes/ elevation (punya), and avoid actions that are degrading or negative (papa). He also points out that yoga is a repetition (abhyasa), just as rightness is, and that it must be repeated until it becomes a ritual.

Anonymous said...

Two people doing the same movement may seems synchronized, yet be in two different worlds. Why? Because yoga reflects your own energy. It makes you feel all the good and all the bad within you, that which we're not aware of throughout our day but is very much alive within us. The beauty of yoga is that it has nothing to do with age, gender, flexibility, or even strength. It is an entasis practice that leads to the deepest, darkest, most beautiful parts of your soul. It strips away all that which we disguise ourselves with and call identity. It makes you feel your own frequency through movements but more importantly through breath.

If having a body means we are bonded to suffering, then yoga is the only way to both understand and let go of that which no longer serve us. It is because this practice surpasses the boundaries of matter (pakriti), that one can become one with the self (purusha). This is, in my opinion, why yoga is viewed as a sacred practice that requires a continuous and devoted attitude.

Gayle Budow

Daiana Oppecini said...

I feel like Yoga puts our minds and bodies on the same page. We tend to forget the oneness of our beings, lost within daily struggles and shallow worries. At least that is how I felt during the Yoga session we had last week, and although the feeling of oneness is gone I know understand why Yoga is a ritual of repetitions. A concept that resonated with me was Dhyana, profound nonjudgmental meditation, which seems achievable for anyone who practices asana, pranayama, pratyahara, and dharana often and with discipline. Then there is Samadhi, that superior state of consciousness attained by the repetitive practice of Dhyana. It is the mind becoming completely still and aware of the present moment, lost in a trance, forgetting ourselves to become one with the Universe. This might be the moment when we could realize that after all we are God, because we are a part of this Universe, just like a cell is a part of our bodies with no awareness of it.

Cindy Matheus said...

Yoga has been a part of my daily routine for a couple of years now. I depend on it to balance my soul, mind, and body. My mind is a sacred place because of it and I live purposefully, dutifully, and wholly in respect to what yoga has done for me. I sometimes do a chakra meditation and I highly recommend trying it out if you haven’t. There are seven chakras and each chakra contains energy that is felt as you meditate. You are meant to focus on each one individually and see the colors of the chakra expand and feel them connecting to one another as you activate its power.

Daniel Montes said...

This wasn’t my first time doing yoga, I have always enjoyed it but could never really get my mind and body on the same page. It had to do a lot with the fact that I wasn’t very mindful and very closed off. Im not saying that things have changed but I have brief moments where I do open up and I was able to really take in yoga. How you feel one with your body. It’s a great feeling, reason why I kept coming back, also cuz it gave me a great stretch. I would say that doing yoga allows you to open up to your self in ways that you couldn’t do other wise. My girlfriend is a yoga instructor would always tell me that she could feel how closed up I was just by how tight my muscles were, it as if the more open you are to the world the more your body opens up with your mind. I have felt this very few times but the times I have, it has been incredible.

Anonymous said...

I am a person that deals with a lot of anxiety, and yoga has helped me a lot with that. I feel like it is a time one can take to focus of themselves and their body. You are able to control your breathing and look deeper in to your thoughts. It allows you to be in the moment and have you channel your thoughts in one place to be able to relax more. One very important thing during yoga is breathing and that is what allows one to be able to clear their head a thoughts. The relationship between purusha self and pakriti matter is what one is trying to focus during yoga to be able to balance the two. One has to be able to focus on their self body but also realize their surroundings and how to cope with them. It is a peaceful this that though breathing one is able to realease the negative things they are thinking of or that surround them.
Carlota Sanchez

Anonymous said...

I had been doing yoga for about 10 years now, not as often as I would like to, but I can say that I am a yoga practitioner. I see yoga more like a physical activity than a mental activity. Every time I do yoga is like washing my body inside-out. Yoga has helped me to enjoy more the little things of life. To be grateful and appreciate every situation, good or bad, that happen around me. I used to be impatience and get irritate it easily, but with yoga, I have learned to relax. I never judge people, but I used to form an inaccurate impression, but not anymore. Now, I just try to be more empathetic, and accept other people personalities. After our yoga class, I stopped procrastinating and start trying to meditate. I know that with the practice of pranyamas, I will be close to myself. Although, I find extremely difficult to concentrate in only one thing!
Elena Murga

Diego Vieira said...

Although I've never been the biggest fan of Yoga, I must admit it was a great experience. You start feeling at one with yourself, and more relaxed. Alongside this, the previous lessons on the patanjali sutras were great food for thought. How we must channel our thoughts and our actions in order to progress spiritually. Breaking away from Samsara and entering an enlightened state, which we can fall out of if we aren't careful. While we can all access it, not all of us have the ability to put it all together and reach such a state.

Awntonio Rolle said...

I never did yoga before until we did in class that. It was good experience even though I will never do yoga again. I enjoy the music and how at peace everything was. It made me feel like I was enjoying the sun set. It made me feel at piece with myself. The vibe was right and for that moment I felt that nothing really matter at the moment like I in lala land or something.

Eric De Moraes said...

The spiritual aspect of yoga, of achieving a sovereign state of mind and detaching from worldly things is what i find most interesting about yoga, and still it seems so empty. To think that one person diligently trains the mind and body to attain all this knowledge only so they can detach from the world they live in. In Christianity we are thought about resisting the devil and running away from temptation, not detaching from the world completely, the things in this world were made to do good for us and should cherish them, although we must have discernment to not indulge in sinful practices: sex is a good thing god planned for married men and women, adultery and sex outside of marriage would be a sin from which one can repent and be forgiven if the will to repent is in that one's heart. I look close to some of the things taught in the sutra's, as i find them useful to me as a person, but from my religious perspective the reward from the Patanjali Sutra sounds to me as an deprived destination, where the reward from a truly Christianity lifestyle is eternal life in heaven.

felipe rios said...

This class makes more sense when high...

Sebastian M. Lorenzo said...

I have done Yoga on many occasions and I always find it relaxing. Sometimes is strains your body because you're not used to it, or not fit, but overall, it makes you feel really good afterward. I think Yoga of the body is also very different than Yoga of the mind. It seems that both are affect your mind, but Yoga of the body obviously targets more of one's physical stress (muscle pains, stress, etc.). The Yoga of the mind brings one to the, as Prof. Triff has put it, "natural high." It calms the mind and allows it to accept positive energy.